@ Jim's Whim
About ▾ Ask me anything... ▾Search ▾Archive Theme ▾

Posts tagged Race

benppollack:

Jay-Z for marriage equality

benppollack:

Jay-Z for marriage equality

(via pozliving)

Funny, that’s not how I recall it from geography class.
And by “funny”, I mean “racist”, obviously.

Funny, that’s not how I recall it from geography class.

And by “funny”, I mean “racist”, obviously.

(via stormclawradio)

13-Year-Old Jada Williams persecuted over her essay on Frederick Douglass

 Jada Williams, a 13-year old student in Rochester, New York, wrote an essay comparing and contrasting her school experience in 2012 to the educational challenges described in “The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass“.

On Saturday, February 18, 2012, the Frederick Douglass Foundation of New York presented the first Spirit of Freedom award to Jada Williams, a 13-year old city of Rochester student.  Miss Williams wrote an essay on her impressions of Frederick Douglass’ first autobiography the Narrative of the Life This was part of an essay contest, but her essay was never entered.  It offended her teachers so much that, after harassment from teachers and school administrators at School #3, Miss Williams was forced to leave the school.

We at the Frederick Douglass Foundation honored her because her essay actually demonstrates that she understood the autobiography, even though it might seem a bit esoteric to most 13-year olds.  In her essay, she quotes part of the scene where Douglass’ slave master catches his wife teaching then slave Frederick to read.  During a speech about how he would be useless as a slave if he were able to read, Mr. Auld, the slave master, castigated his wife.

Miss Williams quoted Douglass quoting Mr. Auld:  “If you teach that nigger (speaking of myself) how to read, there will be no keeping him. It will forever unfit him to be a slave. He would at once become unmanageable, and of no value to his master.”

Miss Williams personalized this to her own situation.  She reflected on how the “white teachers” do not have enough control of the classroom to successfully teach the minority students in Rochester.  While she herself is more literate than most, due to her own perseverance and diligence, she sees the fact that so many of the other “so-called ‘unteachable’” students aren’t learning to read as a form of modern-day slavery.  Their illiteracy holds them back in society.Her call to action was then in her summary: “A grand price was paid in order for us to be where we are today; but in my mind we should be a lot further, so again I encourage the white teachers to instruct and I encourage my people to not just be a student, but become a learner.”

This offended her English teacher so much that the teacher copied the essay for other teachers and for the Principal. After that, Miss Williams’ mother and father started receiving phone calls from numerous teachers, all claiming that their daughter is “angry.”  Miss Williams, mostly a straight-A student, started receiving very low grades, and she was kicked out of class for laughing and threatened with in-school suspension.

There were several meetings with teachers and administrators, but all failed to answer Miss Williams’ mother’s questions. The teachers refused to show her the tests and work that she had supposedly performed so poorly on.  Instead, the teachers and administrators branded her a problem.

Unable to take anymore of the persecution, they pulled her from School #3.  Wanting to try another school, they were quickly informed that that school was filled and told to try “this school.”  During her first day at this new school, she witnessed four fights, and other students asked her if she was put here because she fights too much.

Long story short, they took an exceptional student, with the radical idea that kids should learn to read, and put her in a school of throwaway students who are even more unmanageable than the average student in her previous school.  To protect their daughter, her parents have had to remove her from school, and her mother has had to quit her job so she can take care of Miss Williams.

To date, the administrators of School #3 have refused to release her records, even though she no longer attends the school, and they have repeatedly given her mother the run around.  We at theFrederick Douglass Foundation have contacted school administrators in regards to this situation and have also been told to hit the pavement.

That’s what we intend to do.  If this school will sacrifice the welfare of an above-average student whose essay, that they asked her to write, they find offensive, we intend to make everyone aware of this monstrous injustice.  The school has a job, and it is not doing it.

We would like as many folks as possible to call the Principal of School #3 and complain about this injustice.  Her name is Miss Connie Wehner, and she can be reached at (585) 454-3525. This treatment of Jada Williams cannot stand.

What say you? Start by making the call!

These stories anger me. I guess I know who I’m calling come Monday morning. There’s nothing more captivating than the brilliance of a child. And for a very young POC to recognize her oppressor at a young age where kids usually don’t see such things, to write and be recognized for her literary parallel to a modern day struggle, and to be treated this way is sickening. I tried calling to leave a message, but the normal office hours are M-F 7:00-3:30. I’m going to call. You should call too.

(via fyuactually)

*tee hee!

*tee hee!

Patricia Heaton, star of ABC Family’s “The Middle”, tells the president to go to a racist ass “pro-life” website on the 39th anniversary of Roe v Wade. Now I have a reason to avoid that show like the plague.




My first year at Miami, MU Students for Life invited Pro-Choice Miami to watch  documentary about how abortion is secretly black genocide because Margaret Sanger believed in eugenics. When the film was over, they sat there expecting us to have had an epiphany; expecting me, as the only black member of PCM, to thank them for helping me to see the light. What they got was one of the most vicious verbal attacks I’ve ever dealt out.

What people like MUSFL and Patricia Heaton don’t understand is that they don’t need to enlighten blacks about their oppression. They hold no secret knowledge that the poor uneducated black folks just can’t understand. What they have is a lack of knowledge and a lack of respect. White women weren’t the only ones who fought for the right to have an abortion. POC were and remain active leaders in the fight for reproductive justice. By perpetuating the myth of black genocide, you are denying black women their agency when it comes to making decisions about their own body and children. The tagline “The most dangerous place for an African American is in the womb” (seen on billboards touting the idea of black genocide) proves they have no idea about the reality of being black in America. You don’t have to look into womens’ bodies to see the genocide of black youth.
Abortion allows black women to make private decisions about their own body and about the fate of their potential children. Who are you to tell a mother (potential or otherwise) about where her fetus which may or may not one day become a child will face danger? If she chooses that a child would be better off not being brought into the world at this time or that she would be better off not bring a child into the world in this time, that is her choice.
You know where black mothers don’t get to make choices? On the street where their children are harassed by citizens and police alike, in schools where their children are told their unintelligent, in stores, in prisons, in airports, and, if people like Patricia Heaton had their way, in their own doctor’s offices.

[People other than those who identify as women need and get abortions.]
Emphasis is mine. Flawless commentary is flawless.

Patricia Heaton, star of ABC Family’s “The Middle”, tells the president to go to a racist ass “pro-life” website on the 39th anniversary of Roe v Wade. Now I have a reason to avoid that show like the plague.

My first year at Miami, MU Students for Life invited Pro-Choice Miami to watch  documentary about how abortion is secretly black genocide because Margaret Sanger believed in eugenics. When the film was over, they sat there expecting us to have had an epiphany; expecting me, as the only black member of PCM, to thank them for helping me to see the light. What they got was one of the most vicious verbal attacks I’ve ever dealt out.

What people like MUSFL and Patricia Heaton don’t understand is that they don’t need to enlighten blacks about their oppression. They hold no secret knowledge that the poor uneducated black folks just can’t understand. What they have is a lack of knowledge and a lack of respect. White women weren’t the only ones who fought for the right to have an abortion. POC were and remain active leaders in the fight for reproductive justice. By perpetuating the myth of black genocide, you are denying black women their agency when it comes to making decisions about their own body and children. The tagline “The most dangerous place for an African American is in the womb” (seen on billboards touting the idea of black genocide) proves they have no idea about the reality of being black in America. You don’t have to look into womens’ bodies to see the genocide of black youth.

Abortion allows black women to make private decisions about their own body and about the fate of their potential children. Who are you to tell a mother (potential or otherwise) about where her fetus which may or may not one day become a child will face danger? If she chooses that a child would be better off not being brought into the world at this time or that she would be better off not bring a child into the world in this time, that is her choice.

You know where black mothers don’t get to make choices? On the street where their children are harassed by citizens and police alike, in schools where their children are told their unintelligent, in stores, in prisons, in airports, and, if people like Patricia Heaton had their way, in their own doctor’s offices.

[People other than those who identify as women need and get abortions.]

Emphasis is mine. Flawless commentary is flawless.

(via sosaysdeb)

Twisted Words: Lame, retarded, gay, nigga. Enough with the...

theclosetthinke:

Lame, retarded, gay, nigga. Enough with the vernacular. It’s embarrassing talking to people who use those words. They are mean spirited at their core. Is it uncool to talk like you have an education?

I am tired of all the hipness. People need to be more considerate…

And let’s add “Homosexual” to the moratorium list, shall we?  It’s so clinical and is usually used to de-personify Gay people.

Meanwhile…”de-personify”?  Whatever. It can be a word if I say it’s a word, dammit!  And yes, I realize the irony of my making up words in a post about etymology.

aatombomb:

aatombomb:


The war on drugs is a war on minorities and the poor. The numbers don’t lie. The Civil Rights movement won a major victory in the late sixties, and in the early seventies we began to wage the war on drugs. We didn’t miss a beat.

— E.D. Kain

The things that tend to go viral the quickest around here are often less then inspiring, but I’m delighted that this one is getting so much attention.

aatombomb:

aatombomb:

The war on drugs is a war on minorities and the poor. The numbers don’t lie. The Civil Rights movement won a major victory in the late sixties, and in the early seventies we began to wage the war on drugs. We didn’t miss a beat.

— E.D. Kain

The things that tend to go viral the quickest around here are often less then inspiring, but I’m delighted that this one is getting so much attention.

"The black revolution is much more than a struggle for the rights of Negroes. It is forcing America to face all its interrelated flaws—racism, poverty, militarism, and materialism. It is exposing evils that are rooted deeply in the whole structure of our society … and suggests that radical reconstruction of society is the real issue to be faced."

- Martin Luther King Jr. (via amywithlemon)

(via amywithlemon-deactivated2012050)

analyzedatheist:

It’s-a-me, a-Mario!!

analyzedatheist:

It’s-a-me, a-Mario!!

surrenda-dorothy:

In Loving memory…
because of the landmark case of loving v. virginia, interracial marriage is legal in america. the lovings just wanted to love and be married to each other in peace- they weren’t looking to change the country… thank God they did.
keep in mind, interracial marriage has been legal for only 44 years… it was legal for only 18 years before i was born (not even a full generation before me…), making it one of the last of the jim crow laws in the US…  meaning, some of my own grandparents, great-grandparents and so-forth relationships were not recognizable by the united states of america. 
please research the lovings more, their story is compelling.
always be with the one you love- not with the color you were told to love.
happy Loving day! 

surrenda-dorothy:

In Loving memory…

because of the landmark case of loving v. virginia, interracial marriage is legal in america. the lovings just wanted to love and be married to each other in peace- they weren’t looking to change the country… thank God they did.

keep in mind, interracial marriage has been legal for only 44 years… it was legal for only 18 years before i was born (not even a full generation before me…), making it one of the last of the jim crow laws in the US…  meaning, some of my own grandparents, great-grandparents and so-forth relationships were not recognizable by the united states of america. 

please research the lovings more, their story is compelling.

always be with the one you love- not with the color you were told to love.

happy Loving day! 

I simply felt compelled to reblog this wonderful little discussion about some of the most sociologically fascinating aspects of learning to cope with discrimination (specifically, Black/White racial issues here).

Good stuff, this! ; )

stfuconservatives:

Now rebloggable, at the behest of drinkthe-koolaid.
I simply felt compelled to reblog this wonderful little discussion about some of the most sociologically fascinating aspects of learning to cope with discrimination (specifically, Black/White racial issues here). Good stuff, this! ; )

stfuconservatives:

Now rebloggable, at the behest of drinkthe-koolaid.

(via deepwithfuture)